Federal Programs » Federal Programs

Federal Programs

No Child Left Behind/Elementary and Secondary Education Act

The Elementary and Secondary Education Act of 1965 (ESEA) was first passed by Congress as part of President Lyndon B. Johnson’s War on Poverty. The most recent reauthorization amending ESEA is the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 (NCLB). The primary function is to close the achievement gap between groups of students by requiring greater accountability and offering increased flexibility and choice. NCLB affects almost every school district and charter school in the state.

  

Title I, Part A Schoolwide Program

 

Purpose

 

A comprehensive reform strategy designed to upgrade the entire educational program in a Title I school to improve the achievement of the lowest achieving students. [ESSA section 1114(a)(1)]

 

Title III, Part A – English Language Acquisition, Language Enhancement, and Academic Achievement Act

 

Purpose

Title III, Part A of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA), as reauthorized under the Every Student Succeeds Act (ESSA), aims to ensure that English learners (ELs) and immigrant students attain English proficiency and develop high levels of academic achievement in English. Title III will also assist all English learners meet the same challenging State academic standards that all children are expected to meet.

 Title IV, Part A – Student Support & Academic Enrichment Grant

 

Purpose

Improve student’s academic achievement by increasing the capacity of states, local educational agencies, school, and local communities to

  • Provide access to, and opportunities for a well-rounded education for all students
  • Improve school conditions for student learning in order to create a healthy and safe school environment; and
  • Improve access to personalized learning experiences supported by technology and professional development for the effective use of technology

 

State Compensatory Education

Under Section 29.081 of the Texas Education Code (TEC), compensatory education is defined in law as programs and/or services designed to supplement the regular education program for students identified as at risk of dropping out of school. The purpose is to increase academic achievement and reduce the dropout rate of these students.

The goal of state compensatory education is to reduce any disparity in performance on assessment instruments administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39 TEC or disparity in the rates of high school completion between students at risk of dropping out of school and all other LEA students (TEC Section 29.081.)

State compensatory education funds were authorized by the legislature to provide financial support for programs and/or services designed by LEAs to increase the achievement of students at risk of dropping out of school. State law, Section 29.081, TEC, requires LEAs to use student performance data from the state’s legislatively-mandated assessment instrument known as the Texas Assessment of Knowledge and Skills (TAKS) tests and any other achievement tests administered under Subchapter B, Chapter 39, of the Texas Education Code, including norm-referenced tests approved by the State Board of Education to provide accelerated intensive instruction to students who have not performed satisfactorily or who are at risk of dropping out of school.

  

State FSP Special Allotments

LEAs (local educational agencies, which includes ISDs and open-enrollment charter schools) receive special state allotments from the TEA's Foundation School Program (FSP).

The following programs have mandated direct expenditures requirements:

  • Special Education: 52%
  • Compensatory Education (SCE): 52%
  • Bilingual Education: 52%
  • Career and Technical Education (CTE): 58%
  • Gifted and Talented Education (GT): 55%
  • High School Education: 100%
 
For more information regarding Federal Programs, contact Evonne Murillo at 210-829-8017.